Who is Johann Wolfgang von Goethe?

  • (noun): German poet and novelist and dramatist who lived in Weimar (1749-1832).
    Synonyms: Goethe

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (, 28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer, artist, and politician. His body of work includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of metres and styles; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, and over 10,000 letters written by him are extant, as are nearly 3,000 drawings.

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Some articles on Johann Wolfgang von Goethe:

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe - Influence
... Goethe had a great effect on the nineteenth century ... Goethe embodied many of the contending strands in art over the next century his work could be lushly emotional, and rigorously formal, brief and epigrammatic ... Goethe was also a cultural force, who argued that the organic nature of the land moulded the people and their customs—an argument that has recurred ever since ...
Doppelgänger - Notable Reports - Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
... his autobiography, Dichtung und Wahrheit ("Poetry and Truth"), Goethe wrote, almost in passing ...

Famous quotes containing the words wolfgang von goethe, johann wolfgang von, johann wolfgang, von goethe, goethe, von and/or wolfgang:

    One doesn’t look at a rainbow any longer that lasts a quarter of an hour.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    Artists have a double relationship towards nature: they are her master and her slave at the same time. They are her slave in so far as they must work with means of this world so as to be understood; her master in so far as they subject these means to their higher goals and make them subservient to them.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    One is never satisfied with a portrait of persons whom one knows. That is why I have always pitied portraitists. One demands so seldom of others the impossible, but demands just that of the portraitists.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    When translating one must proceed up to the intranslatable; only then one becomes aware of the foreign nation and the foreign tongue.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    One doesn’t always lose when one has to do without.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    Nothing is more indispensable to true religiosity than a mediator that links us with divinity.
    Novalis [Friedrich Von Hardenberg] (1772–1801)

    It is always a sign of an unproductive time when it concerns itself with petty and technical aspects [in philology], and likewise it is a sign of an unproductive person to pursue such trifles.
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)