Who is Harriet Beecher Stowe?

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author. Her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) was a depiction of life for African-Americans under slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. She wrote more than 20 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential both for her writings and her public stands on social issues of the day.

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Some articles on Harriet Beecher Stowe:

Washington, Kentucky - History
... In 1833, Washington had a visitor who would become famous, Harriet Beecher, who after her marriage was known as Harriet Beecher Stowe ... At the time of her visit, she was still Harriet Beecher and teaching at the Western Female Institute in Cincinnati ... The Key House where Harriet Beecher Stowe stayed is on Main Street in Washington and now contains a museum named the Harriet Beecher Stowe Slavery to Freedom Museum ...
Let Every Man Mind His Own Business - Plot Summary
... Works of Harriet Beecher Stowe 1830s The Mayflower or, Sketches of Scenes and Characters Among the Descendants of the Pilgrims (1834) " Let Every Man Mind His Own Business " (1839) 1850s Uncle Tom's ...

Famous quotes containing the words harriet beecher stowe, harriet beecher, beecher stowe, stowe, harriet and/or beecher:

    The obstinancy of cleverness and reason is nothing to the obstinancy of folly and inanity.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    A woman’s health is her capital.
    Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    These words dropped into my childish mind as if you should accidentally drop a ring into a deep well. I did not think of them much at the time, but there came a day in my life when the ring was fished up out of the well, good as new.
    —Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    Whatever offices of life are performed by women of culture and refinement are thenceforth elevated; they cease to be mere servile toils, and become expressions of the ideas of superior beings.
    —Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)

    Summer is different. We now have breakfast together, for example ... it hasn’t happened in so long that we’re not sure how to go about it. So we bump into each other in the kitchen. I never saw Ozzie and Harriet bump into each other in the kitchen—not once. Ozzie knew his place was at the table, while Harriet knew that her place was at the stove.
    Nathan Cobb (20th century)

    A little reflection will enable any person to detect in himself that setness in trifles which is the result of the unwatched instinct of self-will and to establish over himself a jealous guardianship.
    —Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896)