What is act?

  • (noun): A short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program.
    Example: "He did his act three times every evening"
    Synonyms: routine, number, turn, bit
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on act:

Qui Tam
... in England and Wales following the Common Informers Act 1951 but, as of 2010, remains current in the United States under the False Claims Act, 31 U.S.C ... Court, and in September of that year, the enactment of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act effectively removed qui tam remedies from ยง 292 ...
European Communities Act 1972 (UK)
... The European Communities Act 1972 (c. 68) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom providing for the incorporation of European Community law into the domestic law of the United Kingdom ... It is not to be confused with the Irish law of the same name, Act No ...
Qui Tam - False Claims Act
... The False Claims Act (31 U.S.C ... The act of filing such actions is informally called "whistleblowing." Persons filing under the Act stand to receive a portion (usually about 15-25 percent) of any recovered damages ... The Act provides a legal tool to counteract fraudulent billings turned in to the Federal Government ...
Racketeer Influenced And Corrupt Organizations Act
... Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, commonly referred to as the RICO Act or simply RICO, is a United States federal law that provides for extended ... The RICO Act focuses specifically on racketeering, and it allows for the leaders of a syndicate to be tried for the crimes which they ordered others to do or assisted them ... RICO was enacted by section 901(a) of the Organized Crime Control Act of 1970 (Pub.L ...
Fiorello La Guardia - Early Political Career - Return To Congress
... His major legislation was the Norris-LaGuardia Act, cosponsored with Nebraska senator George Norris in 1932 ... the enactment of the Clayton Antitrust Act in 1914 and the end of the 1920s ... in defining and restricting their jurisdiction, the act forbids issuance of injunctions to sustain anti-union contracts of employment, to prevent ceasing or ...

More definitions of "act":

  • (verb): Have an effect or outcome; often the one desired or expected.
    Example: "The breaks of my new car act quickly"
    Synonyms: work
  • (noun): A subdivision of a play or opera or ballet.
  • (verb): Be suitable for theatrical performance.
    Example: "This scene acts well"
  • (verb): Discharge one's duties.
    Example: "She acts as the chair"; "In what capacity are you acting?"
  • (verb): Be engaged in an activity, often for no particular purpose other than pleasure.
  • (verb): Behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself.
    Example: "You should act like an adult"
    Synonyms: behave, do
  • (noun): A manifestation of insincerity.
    Example: "He put on quite an act for her benefit"
  • (verb): Pretend to have certain qualities or state of mind.
    Synonyms: play, act as
  • (noun): A legal document codifying the result of deliberations of a committee or society or legislative body.
    Synonyms: enactment
  • (verb): Play a role or part.
    Example: "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"
    Synonyms: play, represent
  • (verb): Perform an action, or work out or perform (an action).
    Example: "Think before you act"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"
    Synonyms: move

Famous quotes containing the word act:

    Without being forgiven, released from the consequences of what we have done, our capacity to act would ... be confined to one single deed from which we could never recover; we would remain the victims of its consequences forever, not unlike the sorcerer’s apprentice who lacked the magic formula to break the spell.
    Hannah Arendt (1906–1975)

    The act of bellringing is symbolic of all proselytizing religions. It implies the pointless interference with the quiet of other people.
    Ezra Pound (1885–1972)

    It was the most ungrateful and unjust act ever perpetrated by a republic upon a class of citizens who had worked and sacrificed and suffered as did the women of this nation in the struggle of the Civil War only to be rewarded at its close by such unspeakable degradation as to be reduced to the plane of subjects to enfranchised slaves.
    Anna Howard Shaw (1847–1919)