Moral

A moral (from Latin morālis) is a message conveyed or a lesson to be learned from a story or event. The moral may be left to the hearer, reader or viewer to determine for themselves, or may be explicitly encapsulated in a maxim.

Read more about MoralFinding Morals, Arts and Morals

Other articles related to "moral, morals":

Arts and Morals
... to take away with them while the novels of Charles Dickens are a vehicle for morals regarding the social and economic system of Victorian Britain ... Morals have typically been more obvious in children's literature, sometimes even being introduced with the phrase "The moral of the story is …" ... Fables are the most famous of stories with strong moral conclusions ...

Famous quotes containing the word moral:

    One might call habit a moral friction: something that prevents the mind from gliding over things but connects it with them and makes it hard for it to free itself from them.
    —G.C. (Georg Christoph)

    Constancy has nothing virtuous in itself, independently of the pleasure it confers, and partakes of the temporizing spirit of vice in proportion as it endures tamely moral defects of magnitude in the object of its indiscreet choice.
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    Today we seek a moral basis for peace.... It cannot be a lasting peace if the fruit of it is oppression, or starvation, cruelty, or human life dominated by armed camps. It cannot be a sound peace if small nations must live in fear of powerful neighbors. It cannot be a moral peace if freedom from invasion is sold for tribute.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)