Kondratiev Wave

Kondratiev Wave


Kondratiev waves (also called supercycles, great surges, long waves, K-waves or the long economic cycle) are described as sinusoidal-like cycles in the modern capitalist world economy. Averaging fifty and ranging from approximately forty to sixty years, the cycles consist of alternating periods between high sectoral growth and periods of relatively slow growth. Unlike the short-term business cycle, the long wave of this theory is not accepted by current mainstream economics.

Read more about Kondratiev Wave:  History of Concept, Characteristics of The Cycle, Modern Modifications of Kondratiev Theory, Criticism of Long Cycles

Other articles related to "kondratiev wave, wave, waves, kondratiev, kondratiev waves":

Kondratiev Wave - Criticism of Long Cycles
... Long wave theory is not accepted by most academic economists, but it is important for innovation-based, development, and evolutionary economics ... universal agreement about the start and the end years of particular waves ...
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... Elliott Wave analysis is distinct from Kondratiev wave analysis ... Modern Kondratiev theory examines the role of variables such as leading technologies, the long credit cycle and demographics in creating long economic cycles ... Although Elliot wave practitioners and other market analysts refer to Kondratiev waves or long economic cycles or surges, the economic literature ...

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