Hasidic Judaism - Hasidic Practice and Culture - Hair

Hair

Following a Biblical commandment not to shave the sides of one's face, male members of most Hasidic groups wear long, uncut sideburns called payot (Ashkenazi Hebrew peyos, Yiddish peyes). Many Hasidim shave off the rest of their hair. Not every Hasidic group requires long peyos, and not all Jewish men with peyos are Hasidic, but all groups discourage the shaving of one's beard. Hasidic boys receive their first haircuts ceremonially at the age of three years (though Skverrer Hasidim do this at their second birthday). Until then, Hasidic boys have long hair. Many non-Hasidic (and even some non-Orthodox) Jews have adopted this custom.

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Other articles related to "hair":

Hair Analysis
... Hair analysis may refer to the chemical analysis of a hair sample, but can also refer to microscopic analysis or comparison ... Chemical hair analysis may be considered for retrospective purposes when blood and urine are no longer expected to contain a particular contaminant, typically a year or less ... Several alternative medicine fields also use various hair analyses for environmental toxicology but these uses are controversial, evolving and not ...
Drug Test - Types - Hair Testing
... Hair analysis to detect drugs of abuse has been used by court systems in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, and other countries worldwide ... In the United States, hair testing has been accepted in court cases as forensic evidence following the Frye Rule, the Federal Rules of Evidence, and the Daubert Rule ... As such, hair testing results are legally and scientifically recognized as admissible evidence ...
Maiko - Appearance
... Hair style Maiko's hairstyle is called nihongami (Japanese traditional hairstyle from Edo period.) They arrange their hairstyle with their own hair ... Maiko put kanzashi (Japanese traditional hair accessories) on their hair with seasonal flowers ...
Hair - Social Role - Religious Practices
... Women's hair may be hidden using headscarves, a common part of the hijab in Islam and a symbol of modesty required for certain religious rituals in Orthodox Christianity ... Sikhs have an obligation not to cut hair (a Sikh cutting hair becomes 'apostate' which means fallen from religion) and men keep it tied in a bun on the head, which is then ... and contemporary, require or advise one to allow their hair to become dreadlocks, though people also wear them for fashion ...
Takarazuka Revue - Influence - Takarazuka and Homosexuality in Japanese Society
... scandal when, for the first time, one of the otokoyaku cut her hair short (previously all of the actresses had their hair long and the otokoyaku simply hid their hair under hats) ...

Famous quotes containing the word hair:

    A bracelet of bright hair about the bone,
    Will he not let us alone,
    And think that there a loving couple lies
    Who thought that this device might be some way
    To make their souls, at the last busy day,
    Meet at this grave, and make a little stay?
    John Donne (1572–1631)

    With girls, everything looks great on the surface. But beware of drawers that won’t open. They contain a three-month supply of dirty underwear, unwashed hose, and rubber bands with blobs of hair in them.
    Erma Bombeck (20th century)

    ... my mother ... piled up her hair and went out to teach in a one-room school, mountain children little and big alike. The first day, some fathers came along to see if she could whip their children, some who were older than she. She told the children that she did intend to whip them if they became unruly and refused to learn, and invited the fathers to stay if they liked and she’d be able to whip them too. Having been thus tried out, she was a great success with them after that.
    Eudora Welty (b. 1909)