God - Non-theistic Views of God

Non-theistic Views of God

See also: Evolutionary origin of religions and Evolutionary psychology of religion

The nineteenth century English atheist Charles Bradlaugh declared that he refused to say "There is no God", because "the word 'God' is to me a sound conveying no clear or distinct affirmation"; he said more specifically that he disbelieved in the Christian God. Stephen Jay Gould proposed an approach dividing the world of philosophy into what he called "non-overlapping magisteria" (NOMA). In this view, questions of the supernatural, such as those relating to the existence and nature of God, are non-empirical and are the proper domain of theology. The methods of science should then be used to answer any empirical question about the natural world, and theology should be used to answer questions about ultimate meaning and moral value. In this view, the perceived lack of any empirical footprint from the magisterium of the supernatural onto natural events makes science the sole player in the natural world.

Another view, advanced by Richard Dawkins, is that the existence of God is an empirical question, on the grounds that "a universe with a god would be a completely different kind of universe from one without, and it would be a scientific difference." Carl Sagan argued that the doctrine of a Creator of the Universe was difficult to prove or disprove and that the only conceivable scientific discovery that could challenge it would be an infinitely old universe.

Read more about this topic:  God

Other articles related to "of gods, god, gods":

Almighty God - Non-theistic Views of God - Anthropomorphism
... The construction of gods and spirits like persons is one of the best known traits of religion ... Sigmund Freud also suggested that god concepts are projections of one's father ... was one of the earliest to suggest that gods represent an extension of human social life to include supernatural beings ...

Famous quotes containing the words god and/or views:

    But as it is written, eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath prepared for them that love him.
    —Bible: New Testament St. Paul, in 1 Corinthians, 2:9.

    Experiences in order to be educative must lead out into an expanding world of subject matter, a subject matter of facts or information and of ideas. This condition is satisfied only as the educator views teaching and learning as a continuous process of reconstruction of experience.
    John Dewey (1859–1952)