Clayton, New Jersey

Clayton, New Jersey

Clayton is a Borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 8,179, reflecting an increase of 1,040 (+14.6%) from the 7,139 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 984 (+16.0%) from the 6,155 counted in the 1990 Census.

Jacob Fisler, who purchased much of the area that is now Clayton, established a community called Fislertown in 1850 that grew substantially after he opened a glass factory. What is now Clayton was originally formed as Clayton Township, which was created on February 5, 1858, from portions of Franklin Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Glassboro Township on March 11, 1878. Clayton was formed as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on May 9, 1887, from portions of Clayton Township. The remainder of Clayton Township was absorbed by the Borough of Clayton on April 14, 1908, and the township was dissolved.

Read more about Clayton, New Jersey:  Geography, Demographics, Education, Transportation, Notable People

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Come, Come, Ye Saints
... Clayton wrote the hymn "All is Well" on April 15, 1846, as his Mormon pioneer caravan rested at Locust Creek, Iowa, over 100 miles west of its origin city of Nauvoo, Illinois ... Just prior to writing the lyrics, Clayton had received word that one of his plural wives, Diantha, had given birth to a healthy boy in Nauvoo ...
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... John Clayton, Jeff Hamilton, and Jeff Clayton brought together a group of Los Angeles-based musicians in 1985 and formed the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra (CHJO) ...
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... Charles Scott Abbott, one of the two originators of Trivial Pursuit James Clayton, President and CEO of Clayton Homes Nancy-Ann Min DeParle, healthcare ...

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