Written

  • (adj): Set down in writing in any of various ways.
    Example: "Written evidence"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on written:

Endianness - History
... However, numbers are written almost universally in the Hindu-Arabic numeral system, in which the most significant digits are written first in languages ...
Ancient Greek Literature (before AD 350)
... Greek literature refers to literature written in Ancient Greek from the oldest surviving written works in the Greek language until approximately the fifth ... alphabets and syllabaries had been used to render Greek, but surviving Greek literature was written in a Phoenician-derived alphabet that arose primarily in Greek Ionia and was fully adopted by Athens ...
Torah
... Shebichtav (תורה שבכתב, "Torah that is written"), and an Oral Torah, Torah Shebe'al Peh (תורה שבעל פה, "Torah that is spoken") ... The words of the Torah are written on a scroll by a sofer on parchment in Hebrew ... According to religious tradition, all of the laws found in the Torah, both written and oral, were given by God to Moses, some of them at Mount Sinai and others ...
Ramsey Campbell - Bibliography - Novels
... text, 1985) The Bride of Frankenstein (1977) (novelisation of the 1935 film, written as Carl Dreadstone) Dracula's Daughter (1977) (novelisation of the 1936 film, written as Carl Dreadstone) The Wolf ...
Second Epistle To The Thessalonians
... of Paul to the Thessalonians, often referred to as Second Thessalonians and written 2 Thessalonians, is a book from the New Testament of the Christian Bible ... book is believed by many scholars to be written between 52-54 AD, shortly after the First Epistle to the Thessalonians was written ...

More definitions of "written":

  • (adj): Systematically collected and written down.
    Example: "Written laws"
  • (adj): Written as for a film or play or broadcast.
    Synonyms: scripted

Famous quotes containing the word written:

    Business is, emphatically, the amusement of Americans, and, to be in keeping with their character, every thing written for their amusement should partake of the useful.
    H., U.S. women’s magazine contributor. American Ladies Magazine (February 1828)

    To be just, that is to say, to justify its existence, criticism should be partial, passionate and political, that is to say, written from an exclusive point of view, but a point of view that opens up the widest horizons.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821–1867)

    He has been described as “an innkeeper who hated his guests, a philosopher, and poet who left no written record of his thought, a despiser of women who gave all he had to one, an aristocrat, a proletarian, a pagan, an arcadian, an atheist, a lover of beauty, and, inadvertently, the stepfather of domestic science in America.”
    —Administration in the State of Colo, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)