Who is Willa Cather?

Willa Cather

Willa Sibert Cather (December 7, 1873 – April 24, 1947) was an American author who achieved recognition for her novels of frontier life on the Great Plains, in works such as O Pioneers!, My Ántonia, and The Song of the Lark. In 1923 she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for One of Ours (1922), a novel set during World War I. Cather grew up in Nebraska and graduated from the University of Nebraska. She lived and worked in Pittsburgh for ten years, then at the age of 33 she moved to New York, where she lived for the rest of her life.

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Some articles on Willa Cather:

Willa Cather Birthplace
... The Willa Cather Birthplace, also known as the Rachel E ... the site near Gore, Frederick County, Virginia, where the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Willa Cather was born in 1873 ... Cather's maternal grandmother Rachel E ...
Willa Cather - Bibliography - Collections
... Under Forty (1936, essays) The Old Beauty and Others (1948, three stories) Willa Cather On Writing (1949, essays) Five Stories (1956, published by the Estate of Willa Cather ...
List Of Fictional Literature Featuring Opera - Authors C
... Carew The Contralto John Stewart Carter Full Fathom Five Willa Cather The Song of the Lark Willa Cather Lucy Gayheart Willa Cather A Wagner Matinee Frances Cavanah ...

Famous quotes containing the words willa cather, cather and/or willa:

    Hats have never at all been one of the vexing problems of my life, but, indifferent as I am, these render me speechless. I should think a well-taught and tasteful American milliner would go mad in England, and eventually hang herself with bolts of green and scarlet ribbon—the favorite colour combination in Liverpool.
    Willa Cather (1876–1947)

    Winter lies too long in country towns; hangs on until it is stale and shabby, old and sullen. On the farm the weather was the great fact, and men’s affairs went on underneath it, as the streams creep under the ice. But in Black Hawk the scene of human life was spread out shrunken and pinched, frozen down to the bare stalk.
    —Willa Cather (1873–1947)

    Write about winter in the summer. Describe Norway as Ibsen did, from a desk in Italy; describe Dublin as James Joyce did, from a desk in Paris. Willa Cather wrote her prairie novels in New York City; Mark Twain wrote Huckleberry Finn in Hartford, Connecticut. Recently, scholars learned that Walt Whitman rarely left his room.
    Annie Dillard (b. 1945)