Who is Walter Lippmann?

  • (noun): United States journalist (1889-1974).
    Synonyms: Lippmann

Walter Lippmann

Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 – December 14, 1974) was an American public intellectual, writer, reporter, and political commentator famous for being among the first to introduce the concept of Cold War; he coined the term stereotype in the modern psychological meaning as well. Lippmann was twice awarded (1958 and 1962) a Pulitzer Prize for his syndicated newspaper column, "Today and Tomorrow".

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Some articles on Walter Lippmann:

Colloque Walter Lippmann
... The Walter Lippman Colloquium, in French Colloque Walter Lippmann, was a conference of intellectuals organized in Paris in August 1938 by French philosopher Louis Rougier ... The colloquium was named after American journalist Walter Lippmann ... Participants included Walter Lippmann himself, German Ordoliberals such as Wilhelm Röpke and Alexander Rüstow, Austrian School theorists such as Friedrich Hayek and Ludwig von Mises ...

Famous quotes containing the words lippmann and/or walter:

    The chief element in the art of statesmanship under modern conditions is the ability to elucidate the confused and clamorous interests which converge upon the seat of government. It is an ability to penetrate from the naïve self-interest of each group to its permanent and real interest.... Statesmanship ... consists in giving the people not what they want but what they will learn to want.
    —Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    Thy gowns, thy shoes,thy beds of roses,
    Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies,
    Soon break, soon wither—soon forgotten,
    In folly ripe,in reason rotten.
    —Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?–1618)