Weber

Weber ( /ˈwɛbər/, /ˈwiːbər/ or /ˈweɪbər/; German: ) is a surname of German origin, derived from the noun meaning "weaver". In some cases, following migration to English-speaking countries, it has been anglicised to the English surname 'Webber' or even 'Weaver'.

Notable people with the surname include:

Contents
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Read more about Weber:  Weber Family, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, O, P, R, S, T, V, W, Y

Other articles related to "weber":

Weber, New Zealand
... Weber is a hamlet situated 28 km south-east of Dannevirke and 23 km WNW of Herbertville, on the east coast of New Zealand ... Weber was named after the German born surveyor Charles H ... Weber (*1830) who died during a surveying project near Woodville in 1886 ...
Tequila Don Weber
... Tequila Don Weber is a Mexican company that produces tequila ... in the Mexican state of Jalisco, was named for Franz Weber, a German naturalist who studied the flora of Jalisco in the last decade of the 19th century ... agave for the production of tequila and named the resulting product Agave Tequilana Weber ...
Carlo Weber
... Carlo Weber (born 6 April 1934 in Saarbrücken, Germany), is a German architect and professor, the founder and senior partner of Auer+Weber+Assoziierte ...
The Gay Falcon - Plot
... are gone, Goldie is abducted by Noel Weber (Damien O'Flynn), Gardner's killer ... Weber orders Goldie to call Gay to offer to trade Goldie's life for the diamond ... However, Weber is shot, and once again, Goldie is found by the police near a dead body ...
Alois Weber
... Alois Weber (30 November 1915 – 19 January 2003) was a Untersturmführer (Second Lieutenant), in the Waffen SS during World War II who was awarded the ... Weber was awarded the German Cross in Gold, in April 1943 which was followed by the award of the Knight's Cross on the 30 July 1943, while serving as a Hauptscharführer (Sergeant Major) and platoon ...

Famous quotes containing the word weber:

    The fate of our times is characterized by rationalization and intellectualization and, above all, by the “disenchantment of the world.” Precisely the ultimate and most sublime values have retreated from public life either into the transcendental realm of mystic life or into the brotherliness of direct and personal human relations. It is not accidental that our greatest art is intimate and not monumental.
    —Max Weber (1864–1920)

    One can say that three pre-eminent qualities are decisive for the politician: passion, a feeling of responsibility, and a sense of proportion.
    —Max Weber (1864–1920)

    No sociologist ... should think himself too good, even in his old age, to make tens of thousands of quite trivial computations in his head and perhaps for months at a time. One cannot with impunity try to transfer this task entirely to mechanical assistants if one wishes to figure something, even though the final result is often small indeed.
    —Max Weber (1864–1920)