List of Williams College Bicentennial Medal Winners

List Of Williams College Bicentennial Medal Winners

The Williams College Bicentennial Medal, was created by Williams College in 1993, the College's 200th anniversary. The Bicentennial Medals "honor members of the Williams community for distinguished achievement in any field of endeavor."

The following is a table listing the number of winners who graduated per five-year period.

Year 1920-1924 1925-1929 1930-1934 1935-1939 1940-1944 1945-1949 1950-1954 1955-1959 1960-1964 1965-1969 1970-1974 1975-1979 1980-1984 1985-1989 1990-1994 1995-1999 2000-2004
Number of Grads 1 3 0 6 4 7 10 8 10 7 13 21 13 12 2 0 1

Read more about List Of Williams College Bicentennial Medal Winners:  1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009

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