Hildesheim - Main Sights

Main Sights

  • The historic market place (Marktplatz) was once considered one of the most beautiful market places in the world. It was reconstructed in 1984–1990 in its former splendour, after its destruction in the March 1945 air raid. The more noteworthy buildings in the square are:
    • The Knochenhaueramtshaus ("Butchers' Guild Hall"), known as a beautiful and fine specimen of half-timbered building. Originally built in 1529 and destroyed in 1945, it was reconstructed from 1987 to 1989 according to original plans. The façade is sumptuously decorated with colorful paintings and German proverbs. Today the building houses a restaurant and the City Museum.
    • The Bäckeramtshaus (Bakers' Guild Hall) is a half-timbered house which was originally built in 1825. It was destroyed in 1945 and rebuilt 1987-89. Today, it houses a café.
    • The Town Hall, erected in the 13th century in Gothic style. Partly destroyed in 1945, it was rebuilt and inaugurated in 1954.
    • The Tempelhaus, a late-Gothic 14th century patrician house, which today houses the tourist information office. It suffered some damage during the Second World War but was restored and inaugurated in 1950.
    • The Wedekindhaus, a 16th century patrician house, is characterized by its high, ornately carved storeys including their ledges with depictions of allegorical figures.
    • The adjoining Lüntzelhaus was built in 1755 in baroque style.
    • The Rolandhaus was originally built in the 14th century in Gothic style. In 1730, the house was remodelled, and an impressive baroque portal and a large bay window were added.
    • The Stadtschänke (Old City Tavern) is a large half-timbered house which was originally built in 1666. The smaller adjoining Rococcohaus was built in 1730 in rococo style.
    • The Wollenwebergildehaus (Weavers' Guild Hall) was approximately built in 1600.
  • The Romanesque St. Mary's Catholic cathedral, with its ancient bronze doors (Bernward's door) (c. 1015). The church was built in the 9th century, but almost completely destroyed in 1945; it was reconstructed soon after the war. It is listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1985. The "Thousand-Year-Old Rosebush" is a reputedly 1,000 years old dog rose bush, allegedly the world's oldest living rose. It continues to flourish on the wall of the Cathedral apse.
    • Museum of the Cathedral: Cathedral Treasure.
  • St. Michael's Church (UNESCO World Heritage Site) – a noteworthy early Romanesque church in Germany and a unique example of Ottonian architecture. It was built from 1010 to 1022.
  • The Andreaskirche (St. Andrew's Evangelical church), a 12th century church with the highest church steeple (120 m) in Lower Saxony. From the top you get an interesting view of Hildesheim and its surroundings. Opposite the church, the Upended Sugarloaf, a famous half-timbered house dating from 1509, is worth a visit.
  • The Roemer-und-Pelizaeus-Museum, with significant collections from ancient Egypt and Peru and spectacular special exhibitions organized every year.
  • The Kreuzkirche (Church of the Holy Cross) was originally a part of the medieval fortifications. It was converted into a church around 1079, severely damaged in 1945 and rebuilt after the war.
  • The Godehardikirche (St. Godehard's Church), built 1133–1172, a Romanesque basilica minor, which is scheduled to become an UNESCO World Heritage Site in the near future. Furthermore, there are some more sightworthy buildings opposite the church: St. Nicolai's Chapel is a former parish church which was built in a romanesque style in the 12th century and transformed into a residential building after 1803, and the Hospital of the Five Wounds which is a large half-timbered house dating from 1770 with a half-hip roof.
  • The Kehrwiederturm (Kehrwieder Tower), built around 1300, is the only remaining tower of the medieval fortifications.
  • Half-timbered houses which were not destroyed during World War II can be seen around St. Godehard's Church and the Kehrwieder Tower, in the streets Keßlerstraße, Knollenstraße, Gelber Stern, Am Kehrwieder, Lappenberg, Brühl, Hinterer Brühl, and Godehardsplatz. Some of them have beautiful wood carvings in their façades, e.g. the Wernersches Haus (1606) in Godehardsplatz and the Waffenschmiedehaus (weapon smith house, 1548) at Gelber Stern.
  • The Monument of the Synagogue (consecrated in 1849 and destroyed by the Nazis in 1938) was erected in 1988 in the old Jewish quarter on Lappenberg Street, one of the most beautiful streets in Hildesheim. The foundations were reconstructed and give you an idea of how big the synagogue was. The reddish brick building (built around 1840) opposite was the Jewish school.
  • Mauritiuskirche (St. Maurice's Church), a romanesque church (11th century) on a hill in the west of the city in the quarter of Moritzberg with a beautiful cloister. The interior of the church is baroque and the tower was added in 1765. From the forest behind the church you get a beautiful view of Hildesheim with many different churches.
  • Kaiserhaus (Emperor's House): Renaissance building (1586) in Alter Markt, the oldest street of Hildesheim, rebuilt after the war. The façade is decorated with Roman statues and medallions. Opposite, there is a noteworthy sandstone bay window dating from 1568. Originally, it belonged to a private house which was torn down at the end of the 19th century. The bay window was dismantled before and added to another house in the Estern part of Hildesheim which remained undamaged during World Wart II. From there, the bay window was removed when the house was remodelled and added to the school at the present site in 1972.
  • Close to the Kaiserhaus (Emperor's house) the Alte Kemenate, a noteworthy medieval store house reaching a height of 5.5 meters, can be seen behind the school in the street Alter Markt. It has a rectangular basis measuring 6,5 meters x 5,0 meters and a cellar with a vaulted construction. The store house, one of the oldest profane buildings in Hildesheim, was built of sandstone in a gothic style the 15th century. According to other sources it might be even older, i.e. built between the end of the 11th and the middle of the 13th century. The building has two floors. As it did not consist of wood it did not burn down in 1945, but was only damaged and immediately repaired after the war. From 1945 - 1951 it was used for residential purposes. The Alte Kemenate is not open to the public, but you get a good impression from the school yard or from the small side street Schenkenstraße.
  • St. Magdalena's Church (Magdalenenkirche) is a small church with large lancet windows in the historic street Old Market (Alter Markt) which was consecrated in 1224. It was originally built in a romanesque style, but enlarged and remodelled in a gothic style in 1456. It houses a wooden altar (about 1520) with carvings and other works of art. In the small street Süsternstraße, a well-preserved part of the medieval city wall with a round tower is worth a visit behind the church. Opposite the church, a tall half-timbered house which was rebuilt in 1981 on the medieval city wall can be seen in the small side street Mühlenstraße. The façade is decorated with wood carvings.
  • The baroque park Magdalena's Garden (Magdalenengarten), which was laid out in 1720 - 1725, is near St. Magdalena's Church. There are many different kinds of rose bushes, a rose museum, pavilions, baroque statues, a well-preserved part of the medieval city wall in it and even a vineyard yielding 100 - 200 bottles of wine per year. In spring, a rare species of wild yellow tulips (tulipa sylvestris) blossoms in the western part of the park.
  • St. Bernward's Church, a neo-romanesque church built 1905-07, destroyed in 1945 and rebuilt from 1948-49, houses a gothic wooden altar retable dating from the beginning of the 15th century.
  • Steuerwald Castle (Burg Steuerwald) in the north of the city, about 3 km from the Market Place, was built 1310–1313. Its tower (25 m) was added in 1325. The chapel, dedicated to St Magdalena, was originally built in the Romanic style and transformed into a Gothic chapel in 1507. Today it is used for weddings and concerts.
  • Marienburg Castle (Burg Marienburg) is in the southeast of Hildesheim, about 6 km from the Market Place. It was built 1346-1349.
  • Sorsum is a former village in the West of Hildesheim which became a part of the city in 1974. There is a sightworthy former domain, founded in the Middle Ages, which was transformed into a residential area after 2000. The pigeon tower, built in 1733, the large barn (1786) and the impressive manor house dating from 1734 are interesting sights in this rural part of Hildesheim.
  • Marienrode Priory (Kloster Marienrode) is in the southwest of Hildesheim, about 6 km from the Market Place. It was founded in 1125. The foundation stone of the present church was laid in 1412. The church was built in gothic style with three naves and completed in 1462. The baroque ridge turret was added in the 18th century. In the church, there are two noteworthy baroque altars dating from 1750 approximately and a gothic sandstone sculpture of Saint Mary which was made in 1460. The organ dates from the middle of the 18th century. A small chapel of the priory, Saint Cosmas and Damian, which was built in 1792, was converted into a small Protestant church in 1830. The priory was dissolved in 1806, but returned to the Catholic Church in 1986. Since 1988, it has again been operated by nuns. Near the monastery there is a large fishpond with a scenic view and a tall windmill built in 1839. The area is especially beautiful at cherry blossom time.

Other places of interest include the Theatre, offering opera, operetta and musicals, drama, ballet and concerts.

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