Golden Globe Award For Best Foreign Language Film

The Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film is one of the awards presented at the Golden Globes, an American film awards ceremony.

Until 1986, it was known as the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Film, meaning that any non-American film could be honoured. In 1987, it was changed to Best Foreign Language Film, so that non-American English language films are now considered for the Best Motion Picture awards. Additionally, this change makes American films primarily in another language eligible for this award, including recent winner Letters from Iwo Jima and nominees Apocalypto, The Kite Runner, and In the Land of Blood and Honey.

Note that since the 1987 change in the criteria for this award, its eligibility criteria have been considerably broader than those for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. American films have never been eligible for this award, and even non-U.S. films had to have principal dialogue in an official (non-English) language of the submitting country until 2006.

Before 1974, the award was given only infrequently, and with several films being jointly honoured per year.

The most honored country in this category is United Kingdom, with seven films honored. The most honoured countries after 1987 are Spain and France.

Read more about Golden Globe Award For Best Foreign Language Film:  Eligibility Criteria, Best Foreign Film, Awards For Foreign Language Films

Famous quotes containing the words language, foreign, film, globe, golden and/or award:

    Great literature is simply language charged with meaning to the utmost possible degree.
    Ezra Pound (1885–1972)

    I journeyed to London, to the timekept City,
    Where the River flows, with foreign flotations.
    There I was told: we have too many churches,
    And too few chop-houses.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)

    Television does not dominate or insist, as movies do. It is not sensational, but taken for granted. Insistence would destroy it, for its message is so dire that it relies on being the background drone that counters silence. For most of us, it is something turned on and off as we would the light. It is a service, not a luxury or a thing of choice.
    David Thomson, U.S. film historian. America in the Dark: The Impact of Hollywood Films on American Culture, ch. 8, William Morrow (1977)

    Where on the globe can there be found an area of equal extent with that occupied by the bulk of our States, so fertile and so rich and varied in its productions, and at the same time so habitable by the European, as this is?
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Fondnesse it were for any being free,
    To covet fetters, though they golden bee.
    Edmund Spenser (1552?–1599)

    The award of a pure gold medal for poetry would flatter the recipient unduly: no poem ever attains such carat purity.
    Robert Graves (1895–1985)