Georgia Health Sciences University

Georgia Health Sciences University (GHSU), home of the Medical College of Georgia (MCG), is a public academic health center with its main campus located in Augusta, Georgia, United States. It one of four research universities in the University System of Georgia (USG). GHSU has more than 2,400 undergraduate and graduate students in five colleges: Allied Health Sciences, Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies, the Medical College of Georgia and Nursing. Students come from most of Georgia's 159 counties and beyond.

On January 10, 2012, the University System of Georgia Board of Regents approved the merger of the university with Augusta State University, to be completed by Fall, 2013. On August 7, 2012, the Georgia Board of Regents named the merged universities "Georgia Regents University". On Oct 25, 2012, the university added the city's name to the university name for marketing purposes. The new name is Georgia Regents University Augusta.

The Georgia Health Sciences enterprise includes the 478-bed GHS Medical Center, the GHS Children’s Medical Center, outpatient clinics, classrooms, laboratories, residence halls, a student center, a wellness center and a medical education library. It has a full-time instructional faculty of 651, a volunteer clinical faculty of 1,795 and a staff of over 3,000, making it the second-largest employer in the region with an annual economic impact of $2 billion.

The university receives over $99 million annually in total sponsored research funding.


Read more about Georgia Health Sciences University:  History, Academics, Campus, Notable Alumni and Faculty

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Georgia Health Sciences University - Notable Alumni and Faculty
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