Education

Education in its general sense is a form of learning in which knowledge, skills, and habits of a group of people are transferred from one generation to the next through teaching, training, research, or simply through autodidacticism. Generally, it occurs through any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts.

Read more about Education:  Etymology, Political Legislation, Systems of Education, Systems of Higher Education, Technology, Adult Education, Learning Modalities, Instruction, Education Theory, Economics and Education, History, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, Internationalization (Globalization and Education)

Other articles related to "education":

Internationalization (Globalization and Education)
... Education is becoming increasingly international ... norms of how the school should operate and what is education ... such as the International Baccalaureate have contributed to the internationalization of education ...
Fort Wayne, Indiana - Infrastructure - Education - Libraries
... In 1997, Places Rated Almanac recognized Fort Wayne as having the highest reading quotient of any place in North America, due in part to the city's quality library system. ...
Yaroslavl - Education
... Amongst the non-state funded institutions for further education in the city is the International Academy for Business and New Technologies (MUBiNT), and also a number of ...
Queens' College, Cambridge - Education At Queens'
... disciplines, except the combination of Education with English and Drama ... other Cambridge colleges, undergraduate education is based on the tutorial system ...

Famous quotes containing the word education:

    In this world, which is so plainly the antechamber of another, there are no happy men. The true division of humanity is between those who live in light and those who live in darkness. Our aim must be to diminish the number of the latter and increase the number of the former. That is why we demand education and knowledge.
    Victor Hugo (1802–1885)

    In the years of the Roman Republic, before the Christian era, Roman education was meant to produce those character traits that would make the ideal family man. Children were taught primarily to be good to their families. To revere gods, one’s parents, and the laws of the state were the primary lessons for Roman boys. Cicero described the goal of their child rearing as “self- control, combined with dutiful affection to parents, and kindliness to kindred.”
    C. John Sommerville (20th century)

    Every day care center, whether it knows it or not, is a school. The choice is never between custodial care and education. The choice is between unplanned and planned education, between conscious and unconscious education, between bad education and good education.
    James L. Hymes, Jr. (20th century)